Category Archives: Weeds

Public Consultation Period for the Greater Sydney Regional Weed Strategy ends 8 March!

 

 Greater Sydney Regional Weed Strategy Explained

Greater Sydney Local Land Services (LLS) has created some you tube videos to help explain the new Regional Weed Strategy.

LLS is currently seeking feedback on the plan from 8 February to 8 March 2017.

Swampcare in Wentworth Falls

Kittyhawke Swamp

Kittyhawke Swamp, North Wentworth Falls. Photo by Peter Ardill

Wednesday  29th March  9am – 3pm     Join the long term efforts of volunteers to free this large swamp system of a huge variety of weeds and restore the habitat of the Giant Dragon Fly and the Blue Mountains Water Skink.  A joint NPWS/ BMCC activity.  Lunch and morning tea donated by the Hominy Bakery. Book with Lyndal on (02) 4780 5623 or lsullivan@bmcc.nsw.gov.au by Tuesday 21st March.

  

Consultation on the Draft Greater Sydney Regional Strategic Weed Management Plan

Dear Bushcare Volunteers

Greater Sydney Regional Weed Committee is very keen to hear from as many people as possible on the plan so we hope you can make one of the information sessions.

INVITATION TO A PUBLIC CONSULTATION FORUM on the Draft Greater Sydney Regional Strategic Weed Management Plan

The draft Greater Sydney Regional Strategic Weeds Management Plan (GSRSWMP) will be released for public consultation on 8 February 2017. The plan has been developed as part of the NSW Government’s Biosecurity reform process in response to the Natural Resources Commission’s review which identified the need for a more coordinated approach to managing weeds.

It is estimated weeds cost the NSW agricultural industry about $4.3 billion every year. Weeds also have serious implications on our lifestyles and the natural environment. Native biodiversity in particular has suffered declines in the distribution of many species as a result of invasive plants.

The GSRSWMP will provide the framework for improved management of weeds on both public and private lands by guiding investment to achieve the greatest outcomes in prevention, eradication and containment.

The draft plan was developed by the Greater Sydney Regional Weed Committee in partnership with Local Control Authorities (i.e. local governments), NSW Department of Primary Industries, National Parks and Wildlife Service, environmental interests (i.e. Nature Conservation Council), Landcare, NSW Farmers Association, Nursery and Garden Industry Association and Aboriginal and public land managers.

The Plan will now be made available for public consultation for feedback before being finalised.  As part of the consultation process, Greater Sydney Local Land Services and the four subregional weed committees will host five public forums across the region. The purpose of the forums is to explain the contents and impacts of the draft plan, respond to questions and assist anyone who is considering commenting on the draft plan.

A Forum will be held in Penrith at the Cambridge Park Community Hall 97 Oxford St Cambridge Park on Tuesday 7 February from 5pm -7pm.

To register your interest in attending please email  admin.greatersydney@lls.nsw.gov.au  or phone Greater Sydney Local Land Services on 4724 2100

The Draft Greater Sydney Regional Strategic Weed Management Plan and supporting information is available at  www.lls.nsw.gov.au/greatersydney  from the 8th February 2017.  If a copy is required before this please email admin.greatersydney@lls.nsw.gov.au

The closing date for submissions is 8 March 2017.

The Gully Bushcare Groups’ get-together again in 2016

Another very successful Bushcare Groups’ Gully Get-together was held on November 6 last year. Friends of Katoomba Falls Creek Valley Bushcare Group was joined by Upper Kedumba Bushcare Group; Garguree Swampcare Group and Prince Henry Cliff Walk Bushcare Group who all came together to help  with a severe infestation of Ligustrum sinense (Small-leaf Privet).

The Privet patch before work

After the Privet Loppers were done!

The Get-together is intended to acknowledge and inspire the volunteers for their sustained efforts and highlight the importance of the Bushcare efforts in the catchment. Over 55 people participated (including staff and presenters) contributing a total of 165 hours weed control over an area of approximately 100m2. Many of those attending are new to Bushcare and the day offered a chance to learn new skills while making a valuable contribution to protecting the natural environment of The Gully.

The morning offered an opportunity for the Bushcare groups who regularly work in the Upper Kedumba Creek Catchment to come together to support each other, learn about the Aboriginal Cultural significance of The Gully and to connect with the community involved in caring for it.

Aunty Sharyn Halls welcomed us before we split into groups each aiming to complete a specific task – there were Privet loppers, Montbretia diggers, mobile hand weeders and tea dwellers.

After a solid work session, we reconvened for lunch and to hear talks from:

  • David King—Aboriginal Cultural significance of The Gully;
  • Ian Baird – Bushcare contributions over the past 25 years;
  • Ian Brown – Pherosphaera fitzgeraldii (Dwarf Mountain Pine) Saving Our Species surveys;
  • Eric Mahony – BMCC bush regeneration work plans;
  • Michael Alexander (Prince Henry Cliff Walk Bushcare); Phil Nelson & David Rae (Upper Kedumba) presented snapshot highlights of their groups’ activities.

At the end of the morning, those present left with an increased understanding of the threatened plant species Pherosphaera fitzgeraldii on Katoomba Falls, the importance of looking after The Gully. Motivation is high and we’re all invigorated to continue our Bushcare efforts throughout the catchment to protect the quality of the water flowing over the falls and into the Kedumba River. Thanks to everyone, and for the generous support of the Blue Mountains Food Co-op, Sandy Holmes and the NSW OEH Saving Our Species program for supporting the day.

Cumberland Plain Landcare Support kicks off!

The Cumberland Plain Landcare (and Bushcare) Support Program is kicking off early this year with monthly events designed to bring in volunteers, informal training and a small amount of emergency funding to help western Sydney Landcare and Bushcare groups in need.

The Program is kicking off on the Cumberland Land Conservancy’s “Wallaroo”, on Saturday Feb 11th in Mulgoa. Volunteers will be camping out on this beautiful property with dinner, bush poetry and star gazing. An informal talk about the fauna of western Sydney is also planned for the Wallaroo event.

Other events across western Sydney will be equally entertaining and at unique Cumberland Plain Woodland sites, or other threatened Ecological Communities, including rivers, wetlands and rainforests.
All events will have informal talks about aspects of western Sydney’s bushland and will be catered for.

Volunteers from outside of western Sydney are encouraged to come along and help out. Bush regeneration experience would be great, but not essential as training will be provided. More info? Contact…

Xuela Sledge, Local Landcare Coordinator, Greater Sydney Landcare Network
E: xuela.sledge@greatersydneylandcare.org
Ph: 4724 2146

 

Submissions – Biosecurity Act Regulations close 29 January 2017

Calling all bushcarers – very important news. The Noxious Weeds Act is changing! The new Bioescurity Act 2015 is scheduled to come into force by next June. The Regulations will provide the detail of how the new act will work on the ground. This will determine what powers local authorities have to control weeds. The Regulations are now open for submissions until 29 January 2017.

This is the link for consultation on the new Biosecurity Act Regulations:  http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/content/biosecurity/biosecurity-act-2015

Please take some time to make a submission.

 

Three Gullies Creek Restoration Workshop

eric-mahony-briefs-the-team

Eric Mahony briefs the crew

by Dan Marshall, Coordinator Three Gullies Landcare Group

Three Gullies Landcare (3GLC), as its name implies, consists of three gullies in an area of land bordered by the railway line and Bruce Rd Glenbrook, south of Eureka Rd to number 39 Bruce Rd. The three gullies are fed by watercourses from the east and ultimately deliver the water to Glenbrook Creek via culverts under the railway corridor.

The three gullies are the intermediary from the much higher eastern side residential dwellings, road and water drainage systems and in heavy rain carry significant water flows. Over time, this water flow has caused significant erosion, particularly in Gully One.

During my time with 3GLC, we have used traditional log retaining walls to help slow down the flow. The logs were sourced on site from fallen trees and from removal of weeds. These log walls are situated at various locations along the creek and are of varying heights and widths (depending on the logs available at the time). Although these log walls worked well, retaining silt during low water flows, they were no match for the rate of flow during periods of high rain fall and more importantly didn’t stop erosion of the creek beds.

I discussed this with Tracy Williams and Eric Mahony from Blue Mountains City Council’s Bushcare program for their input. As a result, the plan for an onsite practical workshop was proposed. Timing is everything in life and presently funding is available for assistance and the main material (flat sandstone rock) is cheaply available from expanded pits at the local Blaxland tip.

So on Thursday 9th June, 2016, after initial discussions and a briefing session, and with a workforce headed by Eric Mahony and contractors from “The Bush Doctor” under Shane Grundy, Tracy Williams, the 3GLC and neighbouring Landcare groups (Bush Place, Raymond Rd and Cox Reserve), the work began. Well, mainly the “Bush Doctor” group (about 9 fit young men!) did the heavy lifting of moving the sandstone from the roadside down the gully to appropriate locations along the creek.

Of course, the starting point was at the lowest spot in the gully at the Railway built culvert and then using a step of 300mm (ruler length) the first step was installed using a bed of Bidim (Geotextile fabric). The Bidim was laid and dug in along the leading (upstream) edge, and covered by flat rock at the spill over point and underneath the water fall. The sides were lined by sandstone pieces wedged into the side of the creek wall to reinforce the wall and to direct the water over the flat rock.

Other materials were used such as skinny coir logs held in place by wooden stakes to fill undercut sections of the creek. Existing native plants in the creek bed were protected by hessian mat with appropriate cut outs for the coming plantings. Ultimately further 300mm (ruler) steps continued up the creek until a flat stretch of the creek was reached where future planting of natives will further aid in slowing the flow.  Ultimately approximately half the creek was upgraded and plans were made for another day later this year. It is hoped this allows more plants to be laid and the new work to be settled in.

Lessons learnt:

  • Log retaining walls are fine provided the wall is lower in the centre, otherwise the water will flow around the outside creating more paths;
  • Drops should only be 300mm or less to prevent “boiling” causing undercutting;
  • The base of drops must be solid impermeable material;
  • Natural bends in the creek can be reinforced on the sides but its best to keep drop offs some distance away to minimise the rate of water flow entering the bends;
  • Deep pools can be used or encouraged as spots for aquatic creatures (platypus would be great but unlikely)
  • Silt gathered before walls needs to be monitored and removed where necessary.

Finally it was a pleasure to have a break from weeding for 3GLC and to meet the members of the nearby Landcare groups as well as to have the input from Eric Mahony and the Bush Doctor workforce. Of course the excellent morning tea supplied by Tracy Williams fully replenished us all so we could carry on working until knock off time.

The members of 3GLC look forward to the next instalment.

 

Blaxland Scouts lend a hand to Bushcare in Glenbrook

1st Blaxland Scouts in Action

1st Blaxland Scouts in Action at Bush Place, Glenbrook

The newly formed Bushcare group at Bush Place, Glenbrook welcomed the assistance of local cub scouts and their parents from the 1st Blaxland Scout group at their recent meetup.

Ten year old Otto Timmins elected to assist a community group as part of his work towards the “gold boomerang” badge and, with the assistance of his father, made contact with the coordinator of the group to arrange the visit.

blaxland-scouts2

Otto Timmins doing Bushcare to work towards his “Gold Boomerang” badge – and he worked hard all morning!

Having the scouts on-board proved to be a fabulous help to the group, achieving much more than could ever have been achieved in a normal 3 hr Saturday session. The boys were a happy addition to the team being keen learners and helpers with a real passion for the natural environment. They truly added to the enthusiasm to our already passionate bush-carers.

We welcome the assistance of other Scouts whenever they can spare the time and are happy to assist Scouts in achieving badge competencies in the future.

A Win-Win for all parties!  Many thanks 1st Blaxland Scout Group!

Helen McFadden, Bush Place, Glenbrook, Bushcare Group

glenaslow@hotmail.com

Alex James also put a lot of effort into helping weed African Lovegrass

 

 

Obituary Neil Stuart 16/1/1937 – 26/5/16

Neil Stuart organised many streetstalls for the Friends photo by Rosemary Brister

Neil Stuart organised many street-stalls for the Friends photo by Rosemary Brister

Neil Stuart was the founding member of The Friends of Katoomba Falls Creek Valley in 1989 in response to serious threats to the valley. He ran the Friends but he never dominated it, always listening to different viewpoints on the various issues, which confronted us. In 1990 we started doing a clean-up of tyres, dumped below Cascade Street just before Ian Kiernan launched “ Clean- Up Australia Day”, in which we then participated until 2015 after we found it hard to find rubbish!

In 1991 Neil introduced us to bush regen, which we then did intermittently until 1996, weeding and planting from stock Neil grew in his backyard. Neil held various positions in The Friends, settling for Secretary and Treasurer, a role he performed exceedingly well for many, many years, penning letters to various authorities at the drop of a hat.

In 1996 I assumed responsibility for the Friends’ Bushcare Group, when we began to work monthly for 11  months of the year. Neil attended regularly and enthusiastically on most of our rostered days and annual Clean-Up Australia days. Neil also enjoyed the camaraderie of our post work day lunches often leading the discussions which ensued.

We also needed to raise money for our activities, which we did by holding regular stalls in an often icy Katoomba Street. Indeed, Neil’s jams, which he produced prolifically and enthusiastically was always our biggest seller because they were very good. He even had regular clientele who routinely replenished their supplies.

Over the last few years of his life Neil battled with cancer, facing his end bravely and resolutely. In his last months he was supported with home care by over 30 of his friends looking after him, taking him shopping etc. He died on the 26th May, 2016. We will all miss him.

Vale Neil.   by Les Petö

 

Connected Catchments

Creekline In Full Force  Vale Street - June 2016

Vale St Baramy Trap in Full Flow – June 2016

On May 2 the Leura Falls Creek and Jamison Creek Catchment Working groups came together along with Blue Mountains City Council Natural Areas and Healthy Waterways teams to do “catchment crawls” (minibus tours of the key work sites) in each other’s catchments. Residents of the Vale St end of the Leura Falls Creek catchment were also invited.

In the morning, the Leura Falls Creek tour showcased the recently constructed stormwater upgrades including the Vale St Baramy Trap and raingarden – shown below in full flow with the recent heavy rains in early June. The Jamison Creek Working Group had an opportunity to see what types of stormwater management systems will be installed in the Jamison Creek Catchment in the near future.

After lunch, a tour of Jamison Creek Catchment gave us a chance to learn about where the upgrades are planned and how they will be constructed.

The stormwater improvement projects in both catchments are an initiative between Water NSW and Blue Mountains City Council. The catchment crawl was filmed by KFM Media, Katoomba. Thanks to the tour guides, Eric Mahony and Geoffrey Smith from Blue Mountains City Council and Peter Bennet who designs the Baramy Traps. Thanks to Monica Nugent for driving the bus. And thank you to every one who came on the tour.

Vale Street - June 2016

Vale Street – June 2016 11